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Learn about the types of Stuttering


 Are you working with school-age children who stutter?

Are you looking for ways to be more effective in your work?

In this video, you'll be meeting some elementary school-aged children who stutter and professionals who work with them. You'll see some examples of stuttering as it actually looks and sounds in this age group. Next, you'll hear these children talks about some of their feelings, and finally, you'll see some experience speech and language pathologist show you how to help school-age children who stutter.

To begin, let's look at some speech disfluencies which helps us determine if stuttering is a problem for these children. 

The following are examples of four of the most common types of stuttering.

First, we'll see some examples of Monosyllabic whole-word repetitions. To begin, let's watch Christy repeat the word "cuz".

Therapist: Let's talk a bit about talking, Is talking hard for you, or is it easyt?

Child: Well, sometimes I talk too fast "cuz-cuz" I'm excited.

Let's watch Quentin repeat the words "I and den".

Therapist: What did you do during?

Child: "I-i" think something that goes on paper and "den-den" I just came up with paper clip. 

Here we see some examples of Repetition of sounds and syllables. 

Let's watch Chris repeat the "m" sound in the word "my".

Child: "M-m-my" first name is Chris. I'm 12 years old and I'm in 6th Grade. 

Finally, we see Jamse repeat "s" in the word "see".

Child: You can like "s-s-see" what their problem is. 

Here are some example of Sound prolongation, the 3rd type of stuttering. 

Let's listen as Christy prolongs the vowel in the word "sometime"

Child: Then "soooometimes" I stumble over words. 

Finally, let's see Justin prolong the "e" in the word "we"

Child: It was like "weeeee" were driving to farmfields. 

Finally, the fourth type of stuttering is what we call Blocks or stoppages of speech which is sometimes the easiest way to be recognized. Let's watch Drew block on the initial "K" sound in the word "classes"